California Gov. Newsom rejects safe injection site bill

Date:

Governor Gavin Newsom vetoed a bill Monday that would have allowed some California cities to set up supervised drug use sites. The bill, SB57, would have allowed San Francisco, Oakland and the City and County of Los Angeles to approve entities to operate the controlled consumption places, known as overdose prevention programs, until 2028. “The unlimited number of safe injection sites this bill would allow — facilities that could exist well into the latter part of this decade — could create a world of unintended consequences,” the governor wrote in his veto message. “It’s possible that these locations would help improve the safety and health of our urban areas, but if done without a strong plan, they could thwart this goal. These unintended consequences in cities like Los Angeles, San Francisco and Oakland Can’t Be Worsening the drug use challenges in these areas is not a risk we can take.” In his veto, the governor also said he would instruct the Secretary of State for Health and Human Services to gather city and county officials to discuss minimum standards and best practices for safe and sustainable overdose prevention programs. The bill’s author, Senator Scott Wiener, has said California is in the midst of an unprecedented drug overdose crisis, exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic. Drug overdose has been the leading cause of death among adults in California since 2011. Wiener also noted that a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that overdose rates doubled nationally in May 2020 compared to 2019. In a statement, Wiener wrote, “Today, California lost a huge opportunity to get a of our deadliest problems. : The dramatic escalation of drug overdose deaths. Through a proven and extensively studied strategy to save lives and get people into treatment, this veto rejects a powerful negative signal that California is not committed to damage limitation.” Opponents of the bill, including law enforcement groups, welcomed the governor’s decision. “This is clearly a challenging issue that affects our entire state,” said Kory Honea, president of the California State Sheriffs Association and Butte County Sheriff. “We will continue our efforts to protect our communities, but allowing ‘legal’ drug use is not the answer,” Honea added. “I look forward to working with the governor and my legislative colleagues to find solutions to address the root of this problem and give opioid addicts the loving treatment they need,” said Senator Rosilicie Ochoa Bogh. R-Yucaipa). The sites would have been required to provide a hygienic area supervised by trained personnel, sterile consumption supplies, used equipment collection and safe disposal services for hypodermic needles and syringes. Staff would have been required to monitor participants for possible overdose and, if necessary, provide treatment to prevent fatal overdose, plus access to or referral to substance use and mental health services referrals. There are 165 overdose prevention programs in 10 different countries. New York was the first to authorize the locations in the United States in 2021. Wiener’s office noted that R Hode Island, Massachusetts and Philadelphia are continuing plans to establish the sites.

Governor Gavin Newsom vetoed a bill Monday that would have allowed some California cities to set up supervised drug use sites.

The bill, SB57, would have allowed San Francisco, Oakland and the City and County of Los Angeles to approve entities to operate the controlled consumption places, known as overdose prevention programs, until 2028.

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“The unlimited number of safe injection sites this bill would allow — facilities that could exist well into the latter part of this decade — could create a world of unintended consequences,” the governor wrote in his veto message. “It’s possible that these locations would help improve the safety and health of our urban areas, but if done without a strong plan, they could thwart this goal. These unintended consequences in cities like Los Angeles, San Francisco and Oakland Can’t Be Worsening the drug use challenges in these areas is not a risk we can take.”

In his veto, the governor also said he would instruct the Secretary of State for Health and Human Services to gather city and county officials to discuss minimum standards and best practices for safe and sustainable overdose prevention programs.

The bill’s author, Senator Scott Wiener, has said California is in the midst of an unprecedented drug overdose crisis, exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic. Drug overdose has been the leading cause of death among adults in California since 2011. Wiener also noted that a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that overdose rates doubled nationally in May 2020 compared to 2019.

In a statement, Wiener wrote: “Today California lost a tremendous opportunity to address one of our most deadly problems: the dramatic escalation of drug overdose deaths. Through a proven and extensively studied strategy to save lives and save people this veto sends a strong negative signal that California is not committed to harm reduction.”

Opponents of the bill, including law enforcement groups, welcomed the governor’s decision.

“This is clearly a challenging issue that affects our entire state,” said Kory Honea, president of the California State Sheriffs Association and Butte County Sheriff. “We will continue our efforts to protect our communities, but allowing ‘legal’ drug use is not the solution,” Honea added. please

“I look forward to working with the governor and my legislative colleagues to find solutions to address the root of this problem and give opioid addicts the compassionate treatment they need,” said Senator Rosilicia. Ochoa Bogh (R-Yucaipa).

The sites should provide a hygienic area under the supervision of trained personnel, sterile consumables, collection of used equipment and safe disposal services for hypodermic needles and syringes. Personnel would have been required to monitor participants for possible overdose and provide treatment if necessary to prevent fatal overdose, plus access to or referral to disorders in the use of mental health resources and services.

There are 165 overdose prevention programs in 10 different countries. New York was the first to authorize the locations in the United States in 2021. Wiener’s office noted that Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Philadelphia are continuing plans to establish the locations.

The Valley Voice
The Valley Voicehttp://thevalleyvoice.org
Christopher Brito is a social media producer and trending writer for The Valley Voice, with a focus on sports and stories related to race and culture.

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