Can’t find children’s Tylenol? You might not need it, doctors say

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There are growing concerns about a shortage of Tylenol for children as America faces growing cases of a common respiratory virus and the flu. In addition, COVID-19 is still circulating through communities.

The combination of all three viruses is referred to by some in the medical community as a “triple disease,” and it is driving consumer demand for cold, flu, and pain relief products for children.

However, medical professionals tell FOX Business that medications aren’t always necessary. In some cases, it is safe to let a child pass a low-grade fever.

Dr. Darshan Patel, chief of pediatric emergency medicine at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital in New York, told FOX Business that the hospital typically begins to see cases of highly contagious respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) between October and December, followed by a spate of flu cases. between December and February. Now medical professionals are seeing both viruses at the same time, increasing the rise in viral illnesses from October.

“From October [and] In November, we started to see an increase in viral illnesses, which is to be expected,” Patel said at the start of the school year. at the same time,” he added.

Drugmaker Johnson & Johnson told FOX Business that children’s Tylenol and children’s Motrin “may be less readily available in some stores” due to high demand due to the “extremely challenging” cold and flu season.

The company says it is doing everything it can to ensure consumers have access to such products, including maximizing production capacity, running sites 24/7 and shipping products “continuously,” the drugmaker said.

Ticker Safety Last Change Change %
JNJ JOHNSON & JOHNSON 175.74 -1.46 -0.82%
CVS CVS HEALTH CORP. 101.65 -0.88 -0.86%
RAD RITE AID CORP. 4.44 +0.04 +0.91%

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CVS told FOX Business it sees increasing demand for cold, flu and pain relief products, but is working with its suppliers “to ensure continued access to these items.” If a store has a “temporary product shortage,” CVS says its teams have a process in place to replenish inventory.

Rite Aid, which is facing restrictions on children’s Tylenol due to an issue with its ingredient supply chain, told FOX Business that its pharmacists are readily available “to make recommendations for equivalent products and alternative treatment options.”

The drugstore chain also carries pediatric products that do not suffer from shortages, such as Genexa Kid’s Pain and Fever and Kindermed Kid’s Pain and Fever.

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Low grade fever

Boxes of Johnson & Johnson’s Tylenol Aspirin for sale at a pharmacy in Salt Lake City, Utah February 25, 2021. (George Frey/Bloomberg via Getty Images/Getty Images)

If the child has a low-grade fever and is otherwise well, meaning they’re playing or drinking, “it’s OK not to treat the fever with antipyretics or fever medications like acetaminophen or ibuprophen,” Patel said.

If “you have a viral infection, a fever is your friend,” he added. “The body acts normally to raise the temperature to help fight the viral infection within.”

Dr. Kathy Merritt, a pediatrician at Chapel Hill Pediatrics in Chapel Hill, NC, agrees, telling FOX Business that “fever kills germs.”

“I don’t need the temperature to get lower unless the child is uncomfortable, unless the child is unable to consume fluids, or unless the child has a history of febrile seizures,” which are seizures associated with an elevated temperature in a otherwise healthy child, according to Merritt.

An otherwise healthy child’s body will “take care of itself” and essentially “lower the temperature enough to be safe,” she said.

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High grade fevers

Doctor treating child

Two-month-old Karina, the child of uninsured parents, is given pediatric drops of Tylenol after being vaccinated at a low-cost Rocky Mountain Youth Clinics clinic on July 28, 2009, in Aurora, Colo. (John Moore/Getty Images/Getty Images)

On the other hand, if a child has a high fever, which Dr. Patel is at least 101 degrees, parents should focus on keeping their child hydrated and managing their fever, including taking medications. “However, antibiotics are not always necessary,” he added.

To cool down a child, parents can remove excess clothing or blankets and can also place cool compresses under the armpits, Patel said. One thing he doesn’t recommend is cold baths.

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Merritt said parents can also lower the temperature in a household.

According to Patel, when it comes to medication, parents should look for generics like acetaminophen and ibuprofen rather than brand names for the drugs like Tylenol, Advil, or Motrin.

Merritt said generics are “more readily available in some stores.”

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The Valley Voice
The Valley Voicehttp://thevalleyvoice.org
Christopher Brito is a social media producer and trending writer for The Valley Voice, with a focus on sports and stories related to race and culture.

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