Douglas County child dies from suspected case of brain-eating amoeba

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A child in Douglas County died this week from a suspected infection with the rare brain-eating amoeba, possibly in the Elkhorn River, according to the health department. It is the first known case of its kind in the Omaha area. If confirmed, it will be the first known death of the brain-eating amoeba in Nebraska, according to the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services. The Douglas County Health Department didn’t say exactly what part of the river the child swam in, only that he or she was in the water Sunday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working to confirm it’s the same rare amoeba that showed up in a central Iowa lake this summer. It is found in fresh water, so health officials urge you to take precautions. The amoeba enters the body through the nose, usually while swimming or diving. Officials urge you to keep your head out of the water or stuff your nose. The CDC said only four out of 154 people have survived the infection since 1962. Millions of recreational water exposures occur each year, while only 0 to 8 brain-eating amoeba infections have been identified each year, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. UNMC chief of infectious diseases Dr. Mark Rupp says Nebraska Medicine stocks drugs that treat infections. seems to be more likely when this newer drug called miltefosine is used,” Rupp said.

A child in Douglas County died this week from a suspected infection with the rare brain-eating amoeba, possibly in the Elkhorn River, according to the health department.

It is the first known case of its kind in the Omaha area. If confirmed, it will be the first known death of the brain-eating amoeba in Nebraska, according to the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

The Douglas County health department didn’t say exactly which part of the river the child swam in, only that he or she was in the water on Sunday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are trying to confirm it’s the same rare amoeba that popped up in a central Iowa lake this summer.

It is found in fresh water, so health officials urge you to take precautions.

The amoeba enters the body through the nose, usually while swimming or diving. Officials urge you to keep your head out of the water or stuff your nose.

The CDC said only four out of 154 people have survived the infection since 1962. There are millions of recreational water exposures every year, while only 0 to 8 brain-eating amoeba infections are diagnosed each year, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

UNMC chief of infectious diseases Dr. Mark Rupp says Nebraska Medicine stocks drugs that treat infections.

“A handful of cases have been described where people have survived, and that seems more likely when this newer drug, miltefosine, is used,” Rupp said.

The Valley Voice
The Valley Voicehttp://thevalleyvoice.org
Christopher Brito is a social media producer and trending writer for The Valley Voice, with a focus on sports and stories related to race and culture.

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