Monday morning commute brings first big test of MBTA’s Orange Line shutdown

Date:

The MBTA’s first real test of the Orange Line’s shutdown began Monday, as morning commuters navigated new transportation options ahead of the 30-day shutdown. remain closed until 5pm on September 19. Planned projects include track repairs to eliminate delays, signal upgrades, infrastructure replacement and repairs or upgrades at several stations as part of what the MBTA calls major revitalization and safety work on the Orange Line. MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak helped riders to Orange Line alternatives early Monday and Charlie Card dropped out at Forest Hills Station. “Plan ahead,” said Jamey Tesler, secretary and CEO of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation. “We have many options for Orange Line drivers to go online to the MBTA site and a variety of other sites and information out there. Look ahead to your plan and for both our drivers and drivers we ask that everyone Schedule extra time and be patient. It’s the first day of work. There will be adjustments and there will be challenges.” Line offers approximately 101,000 rides daily, so the impact of the shutdown on commuters is expected to be significant. A fleet of 200 buses will be used to take Orange Line drivers to their destinations in the coming month. Boston Mayor Michelle Wu boarded a shuttle at Forest Hills Station in Jamaica Plain to begin her commute to Government Center. The start of an unprecedented shutdown heralded a complicated dance of diversions and alternatives that Boston officials have called a “transportation emergency.” “It looks pretty smooth on the roads. We’re keeping an eye on a few key spots. Leverett Circle as one of the big ones we’ve been mentioning for a week, but also Charles Circle in Sullivan Square. Those are the real hot spots where we will look at it all morning to see if any adjustments are needed,” said Jonathan Gulliver, administrator of the Massachusetts State Highway. Some streets have been closed or effectively cut in half to provide dedicated lanes for the shuttle buses. Curbside cargo areas have also been added for the State Street between Congress and Washington Streets, Dartmouth Street between St. James and Boylston Streets, and one side of Washington Street between Arborway and Williams Streets will be closed to traffic to create a path for the buses. said creating a path for the buses will have a ripple effect across the region, according to forecasts made by engineers modeling traffic for MassDOT . Motorists have been warned of heavy traffic increases, especially on the roads along the shuttle bus routes. The commuter train frequency has been increased to accommodate expected changes in travel patterns. Riders can also use the Commuter Rail in Zones 1, 1A and 2 for free upon presentation of a CharlieCard or CharlieTicket. Alternatively, Boston is offering a free 30-day pass to ride Bluebikes during the shutdown. From Monday, parts of the MBTA Green Line will also be closed for 28 days. The closure of the Green Line from Union Square to the Government Center stations will allow the MBTA to complete the final phase of the construction work needed to open the Medford Branch, which is expected to open in late November. Shuttle buses will also be offered to replace the Green Line Service. The City of Boston and the MBTA have announced the following number for a new MBTA call center: 617-222-3200. Officials said the “spur of the moment” for the Orange Line’s closure was a safety assessment by the Federal Transit Administration. The FTA has been digging into the MBTA’s record since May after a man was dragged to death on the Red Line in April. A final report from the federal agency is expected to be released within weeks.

The first real test of the MBTA’s Orange Line shutdown began Monday as morning commuters navigated new transportation options ahead of the 30-day shutdown.

The 18 miles of the Orange Line, from the Oak Grove to Forest Hills stations, will be closed Friday night and is expected to remain closed until 5 a.m. Sept. 19.

Planned projects include track repairs to eliminate delays, signal upgrades, infrastructure replacement and repairs or upgrades at several stations as part of what the MBTA calls major revitalization and safety work on the Orange Line.

MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak helped riders to Orange Line alternatives early Monday and Charlie Card dropped out at Forest Hills Station.

“Plan ahead,” said Jamey Tesler, secretary and CEO of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation. “We have many options for Orange Line drivers to go online to the MBTA site and a variety of other sites and information out there. Look ahead to your plan and for both our drivers and drivers we ask that everyone time. Schedule extra time and be patient. It’s the first day of work. There will be adjustments and there will be challenges.”

Officials say they can squeeze work that would normally have taken five years into the month-long spell.

The Orange Line offers approximately 101,000 journeys per day, so the impact of the closure on commuters is expected to be significant.

A fleet of 200 buses will be used to take Orange Line drivers to their destinations in the coming month.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu boarded a shuttle at Forest Hills Station in Jamaica Plain to begin her commute to Government Center.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in a different format, or you can find more information on their website.

The start of an unprecedented shutdown heralded a complicated dance of diversions and alternatives that Boston officials have called a “transportation emergency.”

“It looks pretty smooth on the roads. We’re keeping an eye on a few key spots. Leverett Circle as one of the big ones we’ve been mentioning for a week, but also Charles Circle in Sullivan Square. Those are the real hot spots where we going to look at it all morning to see if any adjustments are needed,” said Jonathan Gulliver, manager of the Massachusetts State Highway.

Some streets have been closed or effectively cut in half to create dedicated lanes for the shuttle buses. Curbside loading areas were also designated for the buses.

State Street between Congress and Washington Street, Dartmouth Street between St. James and Boylston Street, and one side of Washington Street between Arborway and Williams Street will be closed to traffic to create a path for the buses.

Officials have said creating a path for the buses will have a ripple effect across the region, according to projections made by engineers modeling traffic for MassDOT. Motorists have been warned of heavy traffic increases, especially on the roads along the shuttle bus routes.

The commuter train frequency has been increased to accommodate expected changes in travel patterns. Riders can also use the Commuter Rail in Zones 1, 1A and 2 for free upon presentation of a CharlieCard or CharlieTicket.

Alternatively, Boston is offering a free 30-day pass to ride Bluebikes during the shutdown.

From Monday, parts of the MBTA Green Line will also be closed for 28 days. The closure of the Green Line from Union Square to stations in the government center will allow the MBTA to complete the final phase of the construction work needed to open the Medford Branch, which is expected to open in late November.

Shuttle buses will also be offered to replace the Green Line service.

The City of Boston and the MBTA have announced the following number for a new MBTA Call Center: 617-222-3200.

Officials said the “impulse” for the Orange Line’s closure was a safety assessment by the Federal Transit Administration. The FTA has been digging into the MBTA’s record since May after a man was dragged to death on the Red Line in April. A final report from the federal agency is expected to be released within weeks.

The Valley Voice
The Valley Voicehttp://thevalleyvoice.org
Christopher Brito is a social media producer and trending writer for The Valley Voice, with a focus on sports and stories related to race and culture.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Share post:

Popular

More like this
Related