Napa Valley College Files Report of Recent Data Breach Following Ransomware Attack | Console and Associates, P.C.

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On August 25, 2022, Napa Valley College confirmed that the company experienced a data breach after an unauthorized party gained access to sensitive consumer data on NVC’s network. According to NVC, the breach has resulted in the names and social security numbers of certain individuals being compromised. NVC recently sent letters about data breaches to all parties involved to inform them about the incident and what they can do to protect themselves against identity theft and other forms of fraud.

If you have been notified of a data breach, it is essential that you understand what is at risk and what you can do about it. For more information on how to protect yourself from becoming a victim of fraud or identity theft and what your legal options are after the Napa Valley College data breach, see our recent piece on the subject here.

What we know about the Napa Valley College data breach

According to an official statement from the company, the ransomware group launched an attack on Napa Valley College on or about June 10, 2022. The attack immediately impacted the functionality of the NVC network, rendering the school’s website inaccessible and affecting its phone. system and social media accounts. In response, NVC took the necessary steps to secure its network, reported the incident to the police and launched an investigation into the incident.

When Napa Valley College discovered that sensitive consumer data could be accessed by an unauthorized party, it assessed the affected files to determine which information was compromised and which consumers were affected. While the information breached varies from person to person, it may include your name and Social Security number.

On August 25, 2022, Napa Valley College sent data breach letters to all individuals whose information had been compromised as a result of the recent data security incident.

Founded in 1942, formerly called Napa Junior College and Napa Community College, Napa Valley College is a community college in Napa, California. The college offers a range of degrees in accounting, anthropology, art history, astronomy, biology, business administration, chemistry, communication sciences, computer science, criminal law, economics, English, mathematics, nursing, philosophy, political science, sociology, theater and viticulture, and winery technology. Napa Valley College currently has approximately 6,881 students. Napa Valley College employs more than 538 people and generates annual revenue of approximately $29 million.

Why consumers should be extra careful after a breach has leaked their social security number

The Napa Valley College data breach has leaked names and social security numbers of the parties involved. Social Security Numbers are one of the most targeted data types in cyber-attacks. This is partly due to the relative ease with which hackers can use SSNs to conduct identity theft and other frauds.

Social Security Numbers were first introduced by the Social Security Administration (“SSA”) in 1936 as a way for the SSA to track citizens’ earnings. However, because almost every US citizen has their own unique Social Security number, over time they became a way for companies to validate a person’s identity, usually through the last four digits.

While the common practice has moved away from using Social Security Numbers for identification, the government still uses them to track citizens’ incomes. Thus, employers and financial institutions require a person’s social security number and often use these numbers to verify a customer’s identity. In addition, the lack of another viable alternative means that other companies are also using this information.

In short, Social Security Numbers are the “unofficial national identifier code”. So if someone with bad intentions gets their hands on your Social Security number, they can cause a lot of trouble. From opening bank accounts to taking out loans to filing taxes to get your tax refund, criminals could be preying on your Social Security Number. So it is essential for anyone whose Social Security Number has been leaked in a data breach to take the necessary precautions to prevent identity theft and other fraud as much as possible.

The Federal Trade Commission provides some basic guidelines for data breach victims whose Social Security Numbers have been compromised.

  • If a company offers free credit monitoring, take up the offer;

  • Regularly check your credit report for unknown or unauthorized charges;

  • Consider placing a credit freeze, which will make it much more difficult for a criminal to open a loan or account in your name;

  • If you choose not to post a credit freeze, consider posting a fraud report;

  • Try to file your taxes early to avoid identity theft;

  • Don’t believe anyone who calls and claims to be from the IRS, even if they make threats or have your full Social Security Number; and

  • Continue to regularly check your credit report, as well as your existing bank and credit card accounts.

Data breach victims who are concerned that their Social Security Number may have fallen into the hands of a hacker or other malicious person should immediately contact a data breach attorney to discuss their options. U.S. data breach law requires any organization that stores Social Security numbers to do so with care. The organizations that ultimately put this sensitive data in the hands of criminals could be held liable through a data breach lawsuit.

The Valley Voice
The Valley Voicehttp://thevalleyvoice.org
Christopher Brito is a social media producer and trending writer for The Valley Voice, with a focus on sports and stories related to race and culture.

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