NASA discusses scrubbing Artemis 1 launch due to technical issues

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NASA’s Artemis 1 launch was scrubbed Monday. Fuel leaks have forced NASA to scrub the launch of its new moon rocket on a crewless test flight. Now NASA engineers must determine how much repair the engine needs. Is it something that can be done on the trail, or does it have to go back to the VAB? NASA released an update after the scrub Monday afternoon. “It’s not going to fly until it’s done. There are millions of components to this rocket and its systems, and needless to say the complexity is daunting when you put it all in the focus of a countdown,” said NASA administrator Bill Nelson during the update. “Understand that scrubs are just part of this program,” said Nelson. Mike Sarafin, Artemis 1 mission manager, says an analysis followed when lightning struck the towers of the Artemis 1 launch pad on Saturday. After assessment, it was concluded that there were no problems with the missile. On Monday, Sarafin said the team had a software problem. “The team encountered a problem verifying the Orion software,” Sarafin said. It was resolved when it was determined to be a misconfiguration related to the control module not activating. Refueling was also delayed for an hour after a lightning strike. An alarm was sounded at the Kennedy Space Center. Then, according to Sarafin, a hydrogen leak led to delays in charging. The team quickly cooled the interface and worked through the hydrogen leak. Sarafin discussed the engine problems faced by the NASA team Monday morning. held. “We encountered a problem cooling engine #3. We need the engine to be at the cryogenically cool temperature so that it doesn’t startle with all the cold fuel flowing through it,” Sarafin said. additional vent valve problem in the inner tank caused NASA to scrub the launch. “The technical challenges we encountered with the engine breather and the breather valve are just things we need to look at,” said Sarafin. Sarafin also says that the weather conditions were an obstacle the team had to deal with. He says rainfall and lightning would have made the mission a no-go. Sarafin said the launch window is in play on Friday, but the team will need time to look at the data. NASA Administration Trator Bill Nelson also said this about the launch: “We don’t launch until it’s right. And in fact they have a problem with the gases going to the engine venting on one engine. You can’t go, there are certain guidelines,” Nelson said. The next launch attempt will be Friday at the earliest. The Friday launch window opens at 12:48 PM and will remain open until 2:48 PM. is expected to arrive and take off from launch pad 39-B early Monday morning. The launch window opened at 8:33 a.m. and was said to be open until 10:33 a.m. The launch was scrubbed a few minutes after the window was opened due to technical issues. Related: Artemis 1: Everything you need to know for launch day 100,000 to 500,000 people descend on the Space Coast to watch Monday’s launch. For a full list of the best places in Central Florida to watch the historic launch, click here. Brevard County officials prepared for heavy traffic on launch day and even advised parents to plan ahead to drop their kids off at school.” Be patient. Watch out for pedestrians as there will be many people crossing the street ‘ said Don Walker of Brevard County Emergency Management Response. The Artemis program aims to land the first woman and first person of color on the moon and eventually take astronauts to Mars.The inaugural mission will test the new Space Launch System rocket, the Orion spacecraft and multiple components that are designed to make distant space travel safer for humans.The mission will make sure everything runs smoothly for the Orion space ecraft for Artemis 2, expected in 2024. Weather conditions look favorable for launch. More information about Artemis 1 can be found below: Related: Fuel leak interrupts launch countdown of NASA’s Artemis I. Here’s what you need to know at launch Kennedy Space Center Related: UCF Students, Researchers Involved in Artemis Program Related: Artemis 1 Test Mission ‘Critical Step’ in Return to Moon Related: Vice President Kamala Harris Headed to Florida for Artemis 1 Launch Related: ‘Time to Get On to get started’: Final preparations underway for Artemis 1 launch from Cape Canaveral Related: Artemis launch could help NASA gain early lead in lunar race with China

NASA’s Artemis 1 launch was scrubbed Monday.

Fuel leaks have forced NASA to scrub the launch of its new moon rocket on a crewless test flight.

Now NASA engineers must determine how much repair the engine needs. Is it something that can go on the path, or does it have to go back to the VAB?

NASA provided an update after the scrub Monday afternoon.

“It’s not going to fly until it’s done. There are millions of components to this rocket and its systems, and needless to say the complexity is daunting when you put it all in the focus of a countdown,” said NASA administrator Bill Nelson during the update.

“Understand that scrubs are only part of this program,” Nelson said.

Mike Sarafin, Artemis 1 mission manager, says an analysis followed when lightning struck the towers of the Artemis 1 launch pad on Saturday.

After assessment, it was concluded that there were no problems with the missile.

On Monday, Sarafin said the team needed to fix a software issue.

“The team encountered a problem verifying the Orion software,” Sarafin said.

It was resolved after being identified as a misconfiguration related to the control module not activating.

Refueling was also delayed for an hour after a lightning alarm at Kennedy Space Center.

Subsequently, according to Sarafin, a hydrogen leak led to delays in charging. The team quickly cooled the interface and worked through the hydrogen leak.

Sarafin discussed the engine problems faced by the NASA team Monday morning.

According to NASA, the engineering team was troubleshooting an Engine 3 vent flow on the core stage and the countdown was on.

“We encountered a problem cooling engine #3. We need the engine at the cryogenically cool temperature so that it doesn’t startle with all the cold fuel flowing through it at start-up,” Sarafin said.

An additional problem with the vent valve in the inner tank caused NASA to scrub the launch.

“The technical challenges we encountered with venting the engine and the vent valve are just things we need to look at,” Sarafin said.

Sarafin also says that the weather conditions were an obstacle the team had to deal with.

He says rainfall and lightning would have made the mission a no-go.

Sarafin said the launch window on Friday is in play, but the team will need time to look at the data.

NASA administrator Bill Nelson also said this about the launch:

“We’re not launching until it’s right. And basically they have a problem with the gases going on the engine, venting on one engine. You can’t go, there are certain guidelines,” Nelson said.

The next launch attempt will be Friday at the earliest. The Friday launch window opens at 12:48pm and stays open until 2:48pm

The launch would take place early Monday morning and take off from launch pad 39-B.

The launch window opened at 8:33 a.m. and should be open until 10:33 a.m. The launch was scrubbed due to technical issues minutes after the window was opened.

Related: Artemis 1: Everything You Need to Know Before Launch Day

Previous coverage below:

Hundreds of thousands of people visit Brevard County hoping to get a great view.

Anywhere between 100,000 and 500,000 people are expected to descend on the Space Coast to witness Monday’s launch.

For a full list of the best places in Central Florida to watch the historic launch, Click here.

Brevard County officials prepared for heavy traffic on launch day and even advised parents to plan ahead to drive their kids to school.

“Be patient. Watch out for pedestrians as there will be a lot of people crossing the street,” said Don Walker of Brevard County Emergency Management Response.

“We’ve heard as many as 500,000 from the Cape. So you’re talking about nearly doubling the size of Brevard County in just one Monday morning,” Walker said.

Related: Meet the Mannequins on the Way to the Moon on Artemis I

The rocket will launch without astronauts, orbit the moon before returning to Earth.

Instead of astronauts, a mannequin named Commander Moonikin Campos will pilot the Orion spacecraft, with two mannequin torsos named Helga and Zohar along for the ride.

The Artemis program aims to land the first woman and the first person of color on the moon and eventually take astronauts to Mars.

The inaugural mission will test the new Space Launch System rocket, Orion spacecraft and multiple components designed to make distant space travel safer for humans.

The mission will keep things running smoothly for the Orion spacecraft for Artemis 2, which is expected in 2024.

The weather conditions look favorable for the launch.

Find more Artemis 1 coverage below:

Related: Fuel leak interrupts launch countdown for NASA’s Artemis I. Here’s what you need to know

Related: 100,000 Visitors Expected for Artemis 1 Launch at Kennedy Space Center

Related: UCF Students, Researchers Involved in the Artemis Program

Related: Artemis 1 Tests Mission ‘Critical Step’ in Return to the Moon

Related: Vice President Kamala Harris Heads to Florida for Artemis 1 Launch

Related: ‘Time to get started’: Final preparations for the launch of Artemis 1 from Cape Canaveral

Related: Artemis launch could help NASA gain early lead in lunar race with China

The Valley Voice
The Valley Voicehttp://thevalleyvoice.org
Christopher Brito is a social media producer and trending writer for The Valley Voice, with a focus on sports and stories related to race and culture.

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