Shell cracker plant in Beaver County begins operations

Date:

Shell announced on Tuesday that its chemical project in Pennsylvania, Shell Polymers Monaca, has officially started. The cracker plant will break down ethane molecules to produce pellets that can be used to make plastics for products ranging from auto parts to food packages. “It’s a huge economic investment, one of the largest Pennsylvania has seen in recent history. But the jobs can’t be underestimated,” said David Callahan, chairman of the Marcellus Shale Coalition. Shell has said it will generate 600 will create permanent jobs. Shell Polymers Monaca sits on 384 acres bordering the Ohio River in Beaver County. “Building this world-class facility is a fantastic achievement that the team can be proud of; it is a showcase of Shell’s expertise in the field of project delivery,” said Huibert Vigeveno, Shell’s downstream director. “With great market access, innovative offerings and connected infrastructure, Shell Polymers Monaca is well positioned and ready to serve customers with high-quality, competitive products.” of the plant in April 2017. The plant will have three reactors: two gas-phase reactors and one slurry reactor. Now operational, it said float that the plant will produce 3.5 billion pounds of polyethylene annually. Production is expected to be complete in the second half of 2023. This news is a welcome advancement for area businessman John LaCarte. He and his partners bought a golf course near the factory. They plan to build an industrial park for the factory’s suppliers. “We are very excited about the potential that the announcement that the plant will open as operational will have for the development of the petrochemical industry,” LaCarte said. However, there are many local residents who are concerned about the plant. Beaver County Marcellus Awareness Community, also known as BCMAC, founded the Eyes On Shell Watchdog Team. The community volunteer group monitors the smells, sights and sounds of the plant. “Shell said when they started building this plant that they wanted to be a good neighbor,” said Jess Friss, lawyer for Three Rivers Water Keeper. “We hope to hold them accountable for that.” “There is concern that these pre-production plastic pellets could end up in the waterway, which could affect wildlife,” explains James Cato of the Mountain Watershed Association. Cato and Friss have been working closely with community members once a month for the past few years to collect water samples both upstream and downstream in the Ohio River. They call it “Nurdle Patrol” as they search for the plant’s plastic pellets in the waterway. The Beaver County Marcellus Awareness Community is hosting a meeting on Monday, November 21 to present Shell with a to-do list to meet community expectations for transparency and accountability.

Shell announced on Tuesday that its chemical project in Pennsylvania, Shell Polymers Monaca, has officially started.

The cracker plant will break down ethane molecules to produce pellets that can be used to make plastics for products ranging from auto parts to food packaging.

“It’s a huge economic investment, one of the largest Pennsylvania has seen in recent history. But the jobs cannot be underestimated,” said David Callahan, president of the Marcellus Shale Coalition.

Shell has said it will create 600 permanent jobs. Shell Polymers Monaca is located on 384 acres bordering the Ohio River in Beaver County.

“Building this world-class facility is a fantastic achievement that the team can be proud of; it is a showcase of Shell’s expertise in project delivery,” said Huibert Vigeveno, Shell’s downstream director. “With great market access, innovative offerings and connected infrastructure, Shell Polymers Monaco is well positioned and ready to serve customers with high quality, competitive products.”

Shell started construction of the power station in April 2017. The plant will have three reactors: two gas phase reactors and a slurry reactor.

Now operational, the company said the plant will produce 3.5 billion pounds of polyethylene annually. Production is expected to be ramped up in the second half of 2023.

This news is a welcome advancement for area businessman John LaCarte. He and his partners bought a golf course near the factory. They plan to build an industrial park for the factory’s suppliers.

“We are very excited about the potential that the announcement that the plant will open as operational will have for the development of the petrochemical industry,” LaCarte said.

However, there are many local residents who are concerned about the plant. Beaver County Marcellus Awareness Community, also known as BCMAC, founded the Eyes On Shell Watchdog Team. The community volunteer group monitors the smells, sights and sounds of the plant.

“Shell said when they started building this plant that they wanted to be a good neighbor,” said Jess Friss, lawyer for Three Rivers Water Keeper. “We hope to hold them accountable for that.”

“There is concern that these pre-production plastic pellets could end up in the waterway, which could affect wildlife,” explains James Cato of the Mountain Watershed Association.

Cato and Friss have been working closely with community members once a month for the past few years to collect water samples both upstream and downstream in the Ohio River. They call it “Nurdle Patrol” as they search for the plant’s plastic pellets in the waterway.

The Beaver County Marcellus Awareness Community is hosting a meeting on Monday, November 21 to present Shell with a to-do list to meet community expectations for transparency and accountability.

The Valley Voice
The Valley Voicehttp://thevalleyvoice.org
Christopher Brito is a social media producer and trending writer for The Valley Voice, with a focus on sports and stories related to race and culture.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Share post:

Popular

More like this
Related

M&M’s replaces cartoon ‘spokescandies’ with Maya Rudolph following ‘woke’ backlash from Fox News

Following last year's mascot refresh controversy, M&M's announced Monday...

Why There’s No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

OP-ED: Why there's no such thing as a free...

Wall Street extends rally, powered by tech bounce

Baker Hughes falls on missing fourth quarter earnings estimatesActivist...

Wizards trade former lottery pick Rui Hachimura to Lakers

Comment on this storyRemarkThe Washington Wizards have traded Rui...